The Transit of Mercury

The Transit of Mercury

Reported by Scott MacNeill's Columns

Save the date! On Monday, May 9, 2016 an amazing event is coming to the skies over New England. Mercury, the closest planet to the Sun, will visibly pass in between Earth and the Sun. This is called the transit of Mercury and it will be a sight to see! Of ...
  • By: Scott MacNeill
  • On: Tue, 26 Apr 2016 15:32:16 EDT

April Astronomy Highlights

April Astronomy Highlights

Reported by David Huestis's Columns

Though March winds are supposed to bring April showers, I for one am looking forward to milder temperatures and clear skies as the Sun continues its northward journey through our sky, culminating with the Summer Solstice in June. Unfortunately a welcome sh...
  • By: David Huestis
  • On: Wed, 13 Apr 2016 10:16:45 EDT

Photo: Our First Saturn Image of 2016

Photo: Our First Saturn Image of 2016

From Gallery: Planet: Saturn

Saturn has a 26.7º axial tilt and takes almost 30 Earth-years to complete one orbit around the Sun. This allows us to see Saturn's rings at progressively different tilts over a period of 30 years. Summer Solstice happens on Saturn in 2017, at which point ...
  • By: Scott MacNeill
  • On: Mon, 11 Apr 2016 10:12:36 EDT

What Are Black Holes?

What Are Black Holes?

Reported by John Weaver's Columns

We've all heard about black holes. From science fiction to bizarre news stories and beyond, myths and misconceptions have circulated popular culture since their discovery. But what are they? Before we can answer that question, we need to understand a li...
  • By: John Weaver
  • On: Wed, 6 Apr 2016 14:17:10 EDT

Photo: Jupiter in 2016

Photo: Jupiter in 2016

From Gallery: Planet: Jupiter

Jupiter reached opposition on March 8, 2016. At which point it was on the opposite side of the Earth than the Sun, making it the closest point Earth will be to Jupiter for our year. I snapped this photo at Frosty Drew Observatory on Friday March 12th showc...
  • By: Scott MacNeill
  • On: Wed, 30 Mar 2016 09:57:55 EDT

Prime Time for Observing Jupiter

Prime Time for Observing Jupiter

Reported by David Huestis's Columns

It’s been a few months since any of the naked-eye planets have been visible during convenient evening hours for casual stargazers. From mid-November into early 2016, amateur astronomers who wished to view Venus, Saturn, Mars, Jupiter, and a brief and low...
  • By: David Huestis
  • On: Tue, 22 Mar 2016 12:45:35 EDT