Styx

Styx

Wednesday, November 20, 2019

Astronomers using the Hubble Space Telescope discovered icy dwarf planet Pluto's fifth moon in 2012. In 2013, the International Astronomical Union (IAU) named the tiny satellite Styx. Styx was uncovered in a Hubble survey searching for potential hazards for the 2015 New Horizons spacecraft flyby of Pluto.

It is intriguing that such a small planet can have such a complex collection of satellites. The discovery provides additional clues for unraveling how the Pluto system formed and evolved. The favored theory is that all the moons are relics of a collision between Pluto and another large Kuiper belt object billions of years ago.

The moon is estimated to be 6 to 15 miles across. It is in a 58,000-mile-diameter circular orbit around Pluto that is assumed to be co-planar with the other satellites in the system.

Parent Object: Pluto

Changing Data

Rises:
Sets:
Apparent Magnitude:
Illumination:
%
Size (")
Distance in light minutes:
Distance in miles:
0
Distance in AU:

Orbital Data

Rotational Period:
Orbital Period:
Periapsis:
0.000 * 100 km
Apoapsis:
0.000 * 100 km
Epoch:
Inclination:
°
Semi-Major Axis:
0.000 * 100 km
Orbit Circumference:
0.000 * 100 km
Eccentricity:
Ascending Node:
°
Axial Tilt:
°
Albedo:
Color BV:
Color UV:
Equatorial Diameter:
0.000 * 100 km
Equatorial Circumference:
0.000 * 100 km
Surface Area:
0.000 * 100 km2
Surface Gravity:
m/s2
Surface Temperature:
Mass:
0.000 * 100 kg
Volume:
0.00000 * 100 km3
Density:
g/cm3
Absolute Magnitude: