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Log, Jun 29, 2007

9 people. Well nine folks stopped by but no one managed to see anything. A patch of clear skies just above the northwestern horizon teased us all night. By 9 PM even the most optimistic of weather believers (me!?) had to admit that seeing was something less than visible. I finally gave in and started to close up. What really annoyed me is that as I drove a bit inland, the sky cleared. One by one, Venus, Saturn, many stars, then the Moon and finally Jupiter were easily seen. Still that was inland and not at FDO.

A photographer from South County Living was taking pictures of our doings [non-doings!?] last night. As the dates for publication of this magazine article [and articles in the Journal and Globe] draws close I'll let you know.

Sharp eyed Ernie noticed a bug in the tables I've been automatically generating. The mistake was not too noticeable for the slower moving planets, but was very noticeable for the Moon and to a lesser degree Venus. If you asked for the weekly information, you got last Friday's information rather than the upcoming Friday's information. I rounded down a number (the week of the month) that I should have rounded up. As far as I can tell, I introduced this problem earlier this year when I consolidated some "library" files which give the website a common standardized ability to do astronomy. Should any of you notice similar glitches, I very much appreciate being told. I'll try to fix them as quickly as possible. As always, I wouldn't take a manned space trip based on the info in the website.

-Les Coleman

Leslie Coleman
Author:
Leslie Coleman
Entry Date:
Jun 29, 2007
Published Under:
Leslie Coleman's Log
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