Comet C/2014 Q2 Lovejoy

<p>Comet C/2014 Q2 Lovejoy, a long period comet with an orbital period of 8,000 years has been putting on quite a show for skywatchers across planet Earth. Lovejoy has moved high in the skies of the Northern Hemisphere as it makes it way towards perihelion, its closest point to the Sun. The comet's tail has been very exciting to watch as it has been subject to frequent disconnect events spawned by interactions with the solar wind and CME activity.</p><p>In this photo captured at Frosty Drew Observatory in January 16, 2015; Comet Lovejoy is seen with a super sexy tail passing about 4º from the Pleiades Open Star Cluster (Messier 45).</p><p>-Scott</p>

Comet C/2014 Q2 Lovejoy, a long period comet with an orbital period of 8,000 years has been putting on quite a show for skywatchers across planet Earth. Lovejoy has moved high in the skies of the Northern Hemisphere as it makes it way towards perihelion, its closest point to the Sun. The comet's tail has been very exciting to watch as it has been subject to frequent disconnect events spawned by interactions with the solar wind and CME activity.

In this photo captured at Frosty Drew Observatory in January 16, 2015; Comet Lovejoy is seen with a super sexy tail passing about 4º from the Pleiades Open Star Cluster (Messier 45).

-Scott

Comet C/2014 Q2 Lovejoy was identified by Terry Lovejoy on August 17, 2014 and is considered a "long period" comet. En route to the Sun, Lovejoy passes Earth on January 7, 2014 at 43,600,000 miles distant. Then on January 30, 2014, Lovejoy achieves perihelion (its closest point to the Sun) at a distance of 119,912,991 miles. Which is 1.29 times the distance the Earth is from the Sun.

This is a collection of photos captured at Frosty Drew Observatory of Comet Lovejoy.

-Scott

Scott MacNeill
Author:
Scott MacNeill
Entry Date:
Jan 18, 2015
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